Cuban and Mexican Scientists Join Efforts Against Alzheimer’s

Mexico and Cuba have a long history of relations for scientific cooperation. | Photo: @HamlanLuis79591

One of the outstanding projects is the development of the Cneuro-201 molecule, which has shown a powerful neuroprotective capacity in animal models.

March 30 (teleSUR) Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has become a global health challenge due to its devastating impact on quality of life and the growing number of people affected. Describing advances in the fight against this disease, Cuban and Mexican researchers are collaborating on innovative projects to develop treatments and methods of early diagnosis.

In Cuba, studies led by Doctor of Medical Sciences Juan Libre Rodríguez have estimated that about 10.2% of the population over 65 years suffers from dementia, with Alzheimer’s being the main cause. This means that approximately 160,000 people are living with this disease in Cuba today, a figure that is expected to rise to about 273,000 by 2040.

Mitchell Valdés Sosa, Director General of the Center for Neurosciences of Cuba (Cneuro), noted that although the causes of AS are not yet known with certainty, the researchers continue to focus their efforts on developing effective treatments and methods of early diagnosis.

Científicos desarrollan molécula Cneuro-201 para tratamiento y terapia del Azlheimer Sigue la historia en #ElIndependienteMX

One of the outstanding projects is the development of the Cneuro-201 molecule, which has shown a powerful neuroprotective capacity in animal models. This research, carried out in collaboration with Mexican institutions such as the Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute (Cinvestav) and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), has favorable prospects for Alzheimer’s treatment.

In addition, studies are being conducted to develop early diagnostic methods using Cuban radiopharmaceuticals, such as Cneuro-120. These efforts also include research into treatments for other related conditions, such as head trauma, using NeuroEpo, a product developed at Cuba’s Molecular Immunology Center (CIM).

Dr. Valdés Sosa emphasized that these joint efforts demonstrate the commitment of Cuban and Mexican researchers in the fight against Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. Although the road ahead is challenging, hope and conviction in the contribution of these advances to the health of both nations remain strong.

AD, a form of dementia that affects memory and cognitive functions, was first described in 1906 by German neurologist Alois Alzheimer. Today, more than 50 million people worldwide are living with this disease, with the number projected to rise to 80 million by 2030 and 152 million by 2050.

This entry was posted in Healthcare. Bookmark the permalink.